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Tag: poet

Yes, I’m still on about the poetry class

Yes, I’m still on about the poetry class

Don’t ask me why. I’m not even a poet. But I really wanted to learn more about how to write more beautifully. So, in child-like stomping-ness, I found the format called a cinquain. Read about it here. My attempt: Drums beat floating on air Catch my heart’s reverie mirroring a time I once knew, long gone

Wife and War – Amalie Flynn

Wife and War – Amalie Flynn

I stumbled across Amalie Flynn’s work about a month ago and was stuck by the stark beauty of her poetry. Her memoir, Wife and War will be released on 9/11/13.  Her writing was featured by The New York Times At War and by TIME.   She also blogs for The Huffington Post. Read more of her poetry at her blog.  Ventricle, is published with permission of the author. Ventricle When a soldier deploys to war, He goes to a country…

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Labyrinth – Flash Non-FIction

Labyrinth – Flash Non-FIction

Thank you to Portland, Oregon poet, Gail Brooks, for the flash non-fiction piece: Labyrinth. First swallows of coffee down, my eyes begin to widen just a bit. I’m having a quick breakfast at a local favorite spot and leisurely checking out the familiar surroundings. The place is kind of a mess as usual–stuff piled up, somehow functional, not particularly attractive –but comfortable and welcoming and, most importantly, the food sings. It’s always crowded, suggesting that others may find what I…

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Introducing Terri Gadal – Poet

Introducing Terri Gadal – Poet

I’m not sure how I first ran across Terri Gadal’s poetry. As a woman “of a certain age”, I immediately recognized in her a kindred spirit – one brave enough to write about issues of aging.  It’s rare to find a writer willing to explore the dark corners where fear of memory loss and independence dwell – themes Terri faces head on. In a way, the honesty of Terri’s poetry reminds me of Sylvia Plath, although her dark corners were…

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Revisiting an Old Friend: Sylvia Plath

Revisiting an Old Friend: Sylvia Plath

“The vivid tulips eat my oxygen.” Sylvia Plath I hadn’t read Plath for years, but when I recently heard a BBC recording of her reading Tulips, I pulled out my copy of Ariel to say hello to an old friend. Ariel was published posthumously back in the 60s, and contains the poems written in the last months of her life. The collection,  as Robert Lowell writes, was “rushed out at the rate of two or three a day.”